Archive for September, 2014


Embracing the Larger World

As the world continues to show its seemingly consistent strands of light and dark, we are so fortunate to have the gift of yoga as a form of rest and solace as we encounter personal challenges, and take in the turmoil in the larger world, witnessing so much suffering. Michael Stone, a yoga and meditation teacher who wrote Yoga From A World Out of Balance articulates beautifully the integral and seamless connection between our individual lives and our yoga practice, and how the Yamas, or ethical precepts involve taking our practice beyond the immediacy of our own personal lives. I recommend his book! On a more local level, I wanted to share with you these offerings from Fairhaven College, to which the public is more than welcome. Yoga practitioner, peace activist extraordinaire, and Fairhaven teacher Shirley Osterhaus pours passion for justice and bringing the world towards more balance, into seeking and inviting speakers to address the issues of our time. I am publishing the schedule here, hoping some of you may be interested, and also that you may perhaps pass the schedule along to others.

World Issues Forums/Paths to Global Justice

Fall Quarter 2014

http://www.wwu.edu/Fairhaven/news/worldissuesforum/14fall.shtml

Coordinator:  Shirley Osterhaus Shirley.osterhaus@wwu.edu 

    

    

The Thin Green Line”

Eric de Place, policy director, researcher, writer, speaker and policy analyst. He spearheads

Sightline’s work on climate and energy policy.

October 1, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

Long known for its leadership in environmental policy and clean energy, the Pacific Northwest is poised to become a carbon export hub of global consequence. Standing squarely between Asia’s voracious energy markets and huge fossil fuel deposits in the interior of North America—Powder River Basin coal, Bakken shale oil, Alberta tar sands, and remote natural gas fields—the region has become ground zero for fights over fossil fuel infrastructure. The sliver of coast from Prince Rupert, British Columbia to Coos Bay, Oregon is facing new proposals or active development for seven coal terminals, two oil pipelines, eleven oil-by-rail facilities, and six natural gas pipelines. In the next few years, the Northwest will decide whether to double-down on fossil fuel use or act as a thin green line for the climate.

 Community Wellbeing: What is it and how can research help produce more of it?”

Tom S Weisner, Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, Departments of Psychiatry & Anthropology at UCLA

October 8, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

Researchers can make a difference in improving wellbeing through being “committed, fair witnesses”. Committed to research that might improve the well being of families and communities. Fair in the sense of deploying the strongest research designs, methods, questions, and analyses we can.  Witness through ethnography, fieldwork, contextual and cultural understanding and direct, personal connection to the experiences of the participants in our research, as well as through distal, quantitative measures.  Examples will include reducing poverty and improving children’ wellbeing among working poor; improving family accommodation to children with autism in India; understanding friendships and self-identity among youth with disabilities; and understanding the complexity of families and documentation status among immigrants in California.

Fueling the Fire Inside–Bridging the rich diversity of the world’s indigenous cultures through art

Anna Hoover, Unangan artist and community builder

October 15, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

Some of the most brilliant cultures of the world were ahead of their colonizers’ time; and only now, hundreds of years later, are being recognized for their visionary insight into the ways of survival as they pertain to the future of this world.  As indigenous peoples, we must recognize the role our creative leaders play in identifying and interpreting daily history, in embracing creative solutions to the most serious challenges and in producing visual artifacts that tell our stories.

Border ChildrenWhy Are They fleeing?  Human Rights and U.S. Policy in Honduras and Central America 

Dana Frank, Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz

October 22, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

                     7:00-8:30 Garden Street United Methodist Church (Classroom B, 1326 N. Garden St.)

Media reports of unaccompanied, undocumented children arriving at the U.S. border from Central America have depicted their flight from gangs and violence.  But silence largely reigns regarding the underlying economic and political roots of the crisis, in dangerous governments supported by the United States. Professor Frank looks at human rights and U.S. policy in post-coup Honduras, in particular, as well as dynamics within Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua. She will also discuss grassroots efforts across the U.S. and in Congress to affect U.S. policy in Central America.

Another Politics: Talking Across Today’s Transformative Movements

Chris Dixon, organizer, writer, educator from Ottawa, Canada.

October 29, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

“Recent decades have seen the exciting convergence of anti-authoritarian radicalism and broader-based movements in the U.S. and Canada. From this convergence, a growing set of activists – from anti-poverty organizers in Toronto to prison abolitionists in Oakland, from occupy activists in New York to migrant justice organizers in Vancouver – are developing shared politics and practices. They are building “another politics,” to use a Zapatista expression. These efforts combine anti-authoritarian, anti-capitalist, anti-oppression politics with grassroots organizing among ordinary, non-activist people. Drawing on interviews with organizers across North America, this presentation will explore another politics and distill lessons for building effective, visionary movements.”

Broken Spanish: The television audience and the struggle for language and identity

Christopher Chávez, Assistant Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, University of Oregon

November 5, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium                               

Historically, Spanish-language networks have been able to secure a point of difference by defining their audience as “Spanish-speaking”, but as US Latinos have become a cultural and economic force, mainstream networks have been motivated to establish upstart networks of their own.  In this talk I explore how the entry of dominant mainstream players is re-defining the very concept of Hispanic television.  Spanish-language networks have traditionally allowed for the possibility of alternative forms of cultural production but the entry of dominant mainstream players poses the risk of greater homogeneity within the marketplace and the reification of social hierarchies

Gaza Then and Now”

Cindy and Craig Corrie, steadfast advocates for human rights in Palestine and the Middle East;  parents of Rachel Corrie killed by an Israeli military bulldozer in Gaza in 2003.

November 12, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States 

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, feminist, revolutionary, historian 

November 19, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. I will discuss this history, based on my new book, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, in which I challenge the founding myth of the United States and radically reframe US history, tracing US aggressive militarism and imperialist foreign wars to the earlier wars of conquest and land-theft against Indigenous nations.

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Schedule Reminder

All classes are meeting this week; NO CLASSES the 29th of September through the 3rd of October! Happy Autumn!autumn-leaves-light

Kelly Achieves Iyengar Teacher Certification!

kelly india certMany of you remember Kelly in her devotion to studying yoga, and her kind assistance in some of my classes during her apprenticing times. This image is from one of Kelly’s times at the Institute in Pune, India. Kelly has very recently been certified, and noteworthy is the wonderful feedback she received in her assessment. I hope you will join me in offering your blessings and good wishes as Kelly continues along her dedicated path in Iyengar yoga. She is scheduled to study at the Institute once again in December! We miss you in Bellingham Kelly!

Late Summer and Fall Classes

As summer exhales her last warm breath, the faint cool breeze of autumn arrives on the inhale. It appears on the edges of the day during the portals of dawn and dusk, the coolness like bookends on an otherwise hot day, a gentle intimation that one season is ending and another is beginning. The exuberance of summer begins to bow out as the introspection of autumn takes center stage.

Seen through the lens of transitions, each season carries archetypal principles that, when approached consciously, can guide us into deeper layers of ourselves. Where winter signals a slow silence, spring awakens an inner rebirth, and summer celebrates the fullness of our joy, autumn invites us to turn inward and shed what no longer serves us.

~Sheryl Paul

Dear Friends,

With the outbreath of summer, comes the renewal of traveling the more interior journey of Autumn, and I look forward to exploring the practices of yoga with many of you in the coming days. The Autumn classes will be held from September 8th through Novemer 20th, with 10 sessions for each class, with the return of last Spring’s schedule: Mondays at 8Petals, 5:15 pm, Tuesdays at Turtle Haven at 9:45 am, Wednesdays 5:15pm and 7 pm at Turtle Haven, and Thursdays at noon, at 8Petals!

Those of us meeting for meditation classes on Wednesday nights this summer at 8Petals had some poetic and nourishing moments of sharing and silence, and there will be other multifacted yoga offerings named when I return from a vacation. These different classes approach yoga in its fuller journey, which includes more direct exploration of ourselves as individuals in the context of community, and the more subtle aspects of our existence. Please stay tuned! 428px-Patanjali