The Heart and Purpose of Yoga in the Bhagavad Gita and the Yoga Sutras

The Yoga Sutras attributed to Patañjali and the Bhagavad Gita are the two classical texts of yoga, but their approaches to yoga are very different, even though both of them aim at freedom from what one calls oneself.

The Yoga Sutras aims at attaining samadhi, which is defined by Patañjali as emptying of oneself,  by working at diminishing all the obstructions to it. It is mainly devoted to the mental discipline of cultivating a counter-flow to all the usual tendencies of the mind, thereby gradually leading to deeper and deeper meditation.

The yoga taught in the Bhagavad Gita is aimed at fulfilling dharma, that is to say responsibility for the maintenance of order, at all levels—within oneself, in the family, in the society, on the planet and in the cosmos. Therefore, there is naturally much attention given to right action, sacred knowledge and love in this book, perhaps the single most important text to originate from India.

Although the main focus will be on the Yoga Sutras and the Bhagavad Gita, occasionally attention will be drawn to the many similarities and differences in the other spiritual traditions, especially in the Gospel of John, long considered the spiritual gospel among the canonical gospels, and the non-canonical gospels of Thomas and Philip.

There will be optional asana and pranayama classes (paid for separately) with Elizabeth Kerwin, as well as self reflection exercises and some singing and chanting, as a part of the workshop.  The participants are welcome to attend the optional yoga classes with some asanas and pranayama before the formal workshop on Saturday and Sunday mornings.

For more information about Ravi go here: Ravi

Questions? Contact Elizabeth at elizabethkerwinyoga@gmail.com or 360-303-3892